About the student


I am sure that I face the same types of problems and concerns millions of students face worldwide. This blog is a place to voice those concerns and a platform on which to discuss these ideas.

I am a nineteen year old English Literature student who is looking forward to moving on to the world of journalism. I am interested in Politics and feel strongly about how decisions made in Parliament without the consultation of students can have such a huge impact on us. There are always two sides to a story but sadly we do not really get the whole picture when it comes to matters regarding people who are not given a clear and loud platform to speak from. We see this in Education as well as Politics.

I enjoy reading, well I love reading but I am also interested in all sorts of things from art (check out my art posts!), movies, games, history, journalism and technology.

This blog was first created to voice my opinions on the fees universities charge and the problems it causes. So the articles related to that topic are the first three I posted, ‘A dilemma’, ‘Ageism’ and ‘What to do about those dreadful fees.’ However, my blog has developed and expanded into much more areas so now I like to write about any topic that interests me, with perhaps some examples of my creative writing thrown in every now and then.

The problems with education are not restricted to merely students but to all adults, young and old. This is because whatever system is in place, it will create the leaders of tomorrow and whether you are a student, parent, uncle, aunt, grandparent, you must want the best for those whom you hold dear. So follow this blog and participate in the fight for a better future as well as a few light hearted moments from the life of A Worried Student.

I hope you enjoy reading my blog and if you have any comments or want to get in touch, then feel free to comment below.

Or you can contact me on:

aworriedstudentsblog@gmail.com

A Worried Student

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316 thoughts on “About the student

  1. It’s good to see that you’re into studying a language that will be dead in a couple decades…lol You’ll be able to translate to the hold outs if we’re still here. Seriously Politicians should know between a tomato and a tomatoe Found my ealier msg wooops

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hello, Thank you very much for stopping by my blog and for the follow. I certainly had a handful to say about the fees associated with pursing an higher education nowadays. Furthermore, I could certainly relate to being a “worried student…almost the story of my school life”. I’ll be following here. God Bless!

    Like

  3. Your blog is awesome! You cover very important issues in our education system, and being an almost freshman in college myself, it’s all very relevant. I’m not sure if you do awards (and I’m sorry to have bothered you if you don’t) but I’ve nominated you for The Very Inspiring Blogger Award! You can check it out here: http://wanderingrush.wordpress.com/2014/06/14/the-very-inspiring-blogger-award/
    Thanks, and have a great day!
    Morgan

    Like

  4. Greetings.
    Thanks for taking the time to view the post and the acknowledgement by liking same. Not much on responding to such, and by the content scanned herein, you are indeed correct to voice concern, although, refrain from worrying, the issues faced by yourself and the world. Thanks again.
    Ichibon

    Like

  5. You might want to do some research into online learning. One of my friends lives in California but is getting her degree from Arizona State. The program is completely online. The college I attended is offering a completely online MBA program that is getting national recognition.
    Cheaper online learning is the future and it is going to revolutionize education. I just took a course about Constitutional Law from a Yale professor!

    Like

    • Online education certainly is a great way to avoid the high cost of getting a degree. Sadly however, it seems the UK has yet to embrace this idea more openly. We currently have something called Open University where you can do courses at home but its cost has also risen to £6,000 a year. The fact it is not regarded as highly by employers means the difference of £3,000 between it and a ‘traditional’ degree is not really worth it at the moment.

      Like

      • I just padded my paralegal resume with six law courses I took online for free at coursera.com. Constitutional Law from Yale, Environmental Law from Univ. NC. There are free courses out there. There will be more soon. Heck, if you are good at something do an online course and get money from advertisers.

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  6. Seeing that You are: ‘…interested in Politics and feel strongly about how decisions made in Parliament without the consultation of students can have such a huge impact on us,’ and,
    As a Grandfather, in age at least, i want to and DO ‘participate in the fight for a better future,’ I hope that You (and I) can become less worried!
    You write Well. Kudos. Keep up the Good work. Regards.

    Like

  7. You’ve been nominated for The Very Inspiring Blogger Award. Click here to read seven pointless facts about me and claim the award. Or not. It’s your life.

    And, so what if this is a generic message. The sincerity is there.

    Like

  8. I absolutely love this blog. I’m a highschool student, and I’m fully aware of all the oppression I’m going to have to face once I go off to college and become part of this crazy world. I love seeing people like you stand against the oppression and it’s inspirational to see blogs like this. I feel like students and young adults get brushed aside to easy these days, when we all have a voice and a brain and deserve to use it all the same. Best of luck! 🙂

    Like

  9. Hello there, my worried friend! 🙂 Thank you so much for finding my blog and for your follow – it is a pleasure to meet you! And congrats on nearing your 2,000 followers landmark. *jealousinagoodway* Perhaps someday… someday. In any case, I appreciate your readership and look forward to keeping tabs on you too! Mother Hen

    Like

  10. I’m glad I found your blog and I think it’s great that you’re exploring such important issues that relate to young adults and adults. I look forward to reading more! Please feel free to check out my teen advice blog and let me know if you have any suggestions or would like to do a guest post (tips, advice, issues you want to spread awareness about, etc.).

    Like

  11. Thanks for visiting Life As a Wave. I was a college, grad, and post-grad student for ten years in the United States and I’m sure I’ll be able to relate to some of your aggravations! 😀 Looking forward to perusing your site.
    Be well,
    ~~~S Wave~~~

    Liked by 1 person

  12. thanks for your follow. Dropped by to see your blog, read “18 year old student” at which point (my own student days being long past – though well spent lol!) I contemplated clicking the little x, but being intrigued by your “London’s falling” title I clicked that instead. Several chuckles and posts later I resolved maybe I wasn’t too old to enjoy your blog after all and clicked follow.
    (Incidentally I met several ex UK students in southern China who’d caught on that they could pay off their student loans very fast as English teachers (high salary, low cost of living, and Chinese girls love guys with blue eyes – if you have them). Personally I think education should be free and gov. salaries less.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hi thanks for checking out my page, got to say yours looks pretty interesting. Best wishes with your dreams of being a writer, it’s sounding good so far, i’m sure you’ll progress with your uni courses so ignore any creative writing class haters. 😛

    Like

  14. I don’t know if you are already – but get involved with your students union and NUS. It’s a great way to get involved with politics and learn about so many movements.
    If you’re brown (which I’m guessing you are from your gravater) you should also get involved with the Black Students Campaign (which is part of NUS). Black is used in it’s political sense to mean all African, Asian, Arab etc students.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am looking to get more involved this year hopefully. My first year went in a breeze and well, I was working most days in the evenings so would have to rush to work. Hopefully I can cut down on that a bit nwxt year.

      Like

  15. Hey! I just came across your blog through some article on English literature. I myself am going to start bachelors in English next month. I’m actually confused by the views people have about studying English. But your blog actually made me feel better about it. I also aspire to be a journalist and am a Muslim so high five on that. I have a choice between English and Mass communication. And the fees of mass comm. is more than twice of that of English. (different universities) Stay blessed and keep writing. I’d appreciate it if you checked out my blog. Thanks. 🙂

    Like

    • Hi, awesome! it is a lot more tough than the English exams/assignments you would be used to but you will also have a lot more time to do other things. Definitely keep on working on your journalistic skills and experience whilst your studying, university is thankfully not an all consuming studious life so you will have free time 🙂 Best of Luck!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. When I was at secondary school there jobs on every street corner, and university was free to those with ability.
    I had the ability, but not the grades. I had a choice of three jobs on the day I left school and don’t regret not doing uni.
    I hate the way the education system has been engineered to reduce unemployment figures, and brainwash teachers that not going is some sort of catastrophe.
    In recent years I’ve tried to work with students (still at school) and help them unlock their potential or face up to the real world.
    I must be one of millions who started work before they were 17, and could purchase my own home by 23.
    As far as I can tell there’s not much chance those opportunities will change anytime soon.
    Starting life with a £30,000 debt is fundamentally wrong.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think as jobs became more scarce, employers began demanding degrees as prerequisites even though the job itself didn’t require it.

      Yeah, nowadays students are taught that you either go to university or fail. But there is a small shift occurring, especially in England. The slow increase in well paid apprenticeship schemes provide another option for students but these are few and very competitive. I am hoping that these will increase as the years go by.

      Thanks for your comment and for visiting my blog 🙂 You certainly were one of the lucky ones to have owned a house at such a young age, and even thought it was a while ago: congrats!

      Like

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